Thursday, 29 December 2016

Christmas in Korea

Being away from family on Christmas is not always easy. I get this intense fear of missing out on all the family events (and all the food) going on at home. Korea doesn't really celebrate Christmas (even Christian families) in the whole festiveness of it all. You'll find the odd Christmas tree and lights in certain areas and in some shopping malls, but generally, people work right up to and straight after Christmas. It's so strange, but it makes me not really miss home and family, because it doesn't even feel like Christmas!!

But of course, we didn't let this stop us from celebrating and celebrating well!! This is how we did it!

Monday, 28 November 2016

Jirisan National Park - A Surprise Winter Wonderland



Right at the end of November we planned a trip to Jirisan National Park. We had been before, doing a small hike to Ssangyesa Temple, but this time we went to a different part of the Park, to Nogodan Peak. My co-teacher had recommended it as an easy, yet pretty walk, that was easy enough for her daughter to tag along too without (too much) complaining.

Tuesday, 8 November 2016

Friday Night Lights

After weeks of being cooped up in the winter and not seeing enough daylight hours, we rejoiced when Spring came around. So started our Friday evening routine of watching the sunset and having a beer together... hence, Friday Night Lights.

Wednesday, 26 October 2016

Seoraksan National Park

Korea has an abundance of many things, mountains and National Parks are near the top of that list. What better place to show of your latest hiking gear in seasonal colors than hiking a mountain inside a national park? Or, if like us, you don't have matching couples hiking gear and when you're keen to head up a mountain you just wear whatever is handy and go. This often brings a few stares and questions like: are you going to be warm enough, cool enough and possibly some variations of are you seriously going up the mountain in that? Maybe they were just laughing at my skinny legs?

Tuesday, 25 October 2016

THe DMZ aka propaganda central


The rest of the world knows very little about South Korea other than the fact that they have super fast internet and are technically still at war with North Korea.

This war leads to sporadic missile tests by their childlike leader and the odd foray into the demilitarized zone, otherwise known as the DMZ, by North Korean soldiers. This is a zone that stretches from the west coast to the east coast. It is 4 km wide and 250 km long. Lined on both sides with electric fences, tank traps, landmines and waiting armies. It serves as a barrier between the communist North and the democratic South. Also lining each border, here's the strange part, are observatories where the public can visit.